outcomes

measuring impact in achievement, culture, and conversation

In our work, we celebrate successes both big and small: from the first words spoken in a new language to the first class of dual-language speakers your school system graduates. Our models include tailored success indicators to help you measure how your students perform and to pinpoint any concern areas in your curriculum before they become problems.

But don’t just take our word for it. Browse through some of the stories shared by our school administrators, teachers, parents, and other community members.

addalingua programs set the standard

partner support

Students at our partner schools achieve advanced levels of proficiency in two languages, because we fully support schools as they attain the three goals of dual language immersion education:

  1. academic achievement equal to or greater than monolingual peers
  2. grade-level biliteracy
  3. cultural competency

consequences of partial immersion 

When schools are not steadfast in these three goals, their programs tend to suffer. One of the biggest mistakes that dual language immersion programs make is minimizing attention to non-English language development, which ultimately leads to dual language learners demonstrating insufficient levels of biliteracy/bilingualism.

For example, the few longitudinal studies that have analyzed the bilingual competency of students who enter DLI programs as home language speakers of the non-English immersion language have found these students develop “non-native” language features, such as Anglicized syntax, as they progress through the grade levels (Fortune, 2001; Potowski, 2007). Studies measuring proficiency in the non-English language for English-dominant students find similar realities. When students do not have sufficient language and literacy skills, they are unable to learn grade-level content. Teachers report having to use learners’ native language to teach complex concepts in upper grade levels (Fortune, Tedick & Walker, 2008; Met & Lorenz, 1997) because the cognitive demands of the academic content exceed the linguistic ability of the students.

how we ensure program success

By way of our 10+ years of research and experience, we help leaders implement addalingua programs, create materials to support the development of two distinct languages, observe students, train teachers, and complete projects with our advisory board. Through this rewarding work, we have developed a set of standards that support dual language immersion students in attaining the three goals above.

quality quadrants

We organize the standards into four focus areas or “quality quadrants:” program fidelity, dual language development, biliteracy and counterbalanced instruction, and progress monitoring. Four standards within each quadrant outline overall program expectations related to the focus area. In turn, four success indicators aligned to each standard describe knowledge or practices demonstrated by four distinct stakeholders: school communities, school leaders, teachers, and students.

quality quadrants

 

work cited

Fortune, T. W., Tedick, D. J., & Walker, C. (2008). Integrated language and content teaching: Insights from the immersion classroom. In T. W. Fortune & D. J. Tedick (Eds.), Pathways to multilingualism: Evolving perspectives on immersion education (pp. 71-96). Clevedon, UK: MultilingualMatters.

Potowski, K. (2007).  Characteristics of the Spanish proficiency of dual immersion graduates.  Spanish in Context, 4 (2), 187–216. 

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our partner schools

No one can speak to the success of our models better than our partner schools. Take a look at the array of schools we serve. Perhaps there is one near you.

view our interactive partner school map

CA

Redlands Christian School, Redlands, CA

Costa Rica

El Puente, Quepos, Costa Rica

FL

Calvary Christian Academy, Ft. Lauderdale, FL
Kendall Christian School, Miami, FL

IA

Pella Christian Grade School, Pella, IA

IN

Covenant Christian School, Mishawaka, IN
Crown Point Christian School, St. John, IN

MI

Calvin Christian Middle School, Grandville, MI
Fremont Christian School, Fremont, MI
Grand Haven Christian School, Grand Haven, MI
Grandville Christian School, Grandville, MI
Holland Christian School, Holland, MI
Holland Public Schools, Holland, MI
Kalamazoo Christian Schools, Kalamazoo, MI
Legacy Christian School, Grand Rapids, MI
Muskegon Christian School, Muskegon, MI
NorthPointe Christian School, Grand Rapids, MI
Oakland Christian School, Auburn Hills, MI
Zeeland Christian School, Zeeland, MI

OK

Metro Christian Academy, Tulsa, OK

TN

Clarksville-Montgomery County School System, Clarksville, TN
St. Peter’s Episcopal, Chattanooga, TN

TX

Legacy Christian Academy, Frisco, TX

WA

Evergreen Christian School, Bellingham, WA